Category: News

Becoming a member could save a life

PosterReally?

On Wednesday of this week I was told by a client that she very much doubts she would be alive today had she not engaged in our services. She was not being dramatic.

Jacqueline Gautier, our Eating Disorders therapist, said that her clients are at an even higher risk of dying from that condition.

You can help us raise funds by simply becoming a member. How so? When you become a member (or rejoin) our agency we have a better chance at receiving the funding we need from the provincial government’s Gaming Fund. With these funds we can reach far more people whose lives or relationships are in crisis, making an even greater positive impact in our community (one that reaches as far away as Port Alberni and Duncan).

Did you know that we are the only agency in the mid-island area to offer eating disorders therapy for adults by a highly experienced Eating Disorders therapist? We have a growing reputation: we are about to take on an Intern who will be learning from Jacqueline, helping us to extend our services for the next few months.

Did you know that we’re the only agency in this region that offers a group that helps women use their anger more helpfully? And that we run a preventative program in a local high school that mentors teens while they learn practical skills? Or that we assist hundreds of clients a year with professional therapy?

We so believe in what we are doing that this year the agency will use at least $20,000 of our savings to keep the doors open and serve the growing number of clients.

We are hard working volunteers and staff. Our overhead costs are extremely small (over 95% of donations go directly to running programs).

We invite you to renew or take out a membership. It is by donation (suggested $5 for low-income to $20). The donation/membership direct link can be found immediately to the right. Any amount $20 or more will receive a tax receipt.

Thank you for helping us help others!

How Do I Control Anger?

by Angela Slade

The instinctive, natural way to express anger is to respond aggressively. Anger is a natural, adaptive response to threats; it inspires powerful, often aggressive, feelings and behaviors, which allow us to fight and to defend ourselves when we are attacked. A certain amount of anger, therefore, is necessary to our survival.

People use a variety of both conscious and unconscious ways to control anger. The three main approaches are expressing, suppressing, and calming. Expressing your angry feelings in an assertive—not aggressive—manner is the healthiest way to express anger. To do this, you have to learn how to make clear what your needs are, and how to get them met, without hurting others. Anger can be suppressed. This happens when you hold in your anger, stop thinking about it, and focus on something positive. The aim is to inhibit or suppress your anger and convert it into more constructive behavior. The danger in this type of response is that if it isn’t allowed outward expression, your anger can turn inward—on yourself. Anger turned inward may cause hypertension, high blood pressure, or depression. Finally, you can calm down inside. This means not just controlling your outward behavior, but also controlling your internal responses, taking steps to lower your heart rate, calm yourself down, and let the feelings subside.

How Do I Tame My Inner Critic?

By Angela Slade

Taming your inner critic is much like taming a wild animal – it must be done with awareness and consistency. It’s a sneaky little beast and will come sliding in the back door, just as you shove it out the front. If you judge it or criticize it, you are feeding the wild beast because you are behaving just like it. Here are some tips to help tame your inner critic. First, identify your inner critic’s top ten places where it likes to hang out. This could be a situation, event, or a place such as the mirror. Second, draw a picture of your inner critic and name it. Place this in a spot where you will see it regularly. Third, get to know your inner critic. Notice what makes it louder; what diminishes its power; what happens if you talk back; what happens when you just look at it calmly in the eyes and reassure it everything will be okay. Experiment with this exercise and notice if there are any shifts in your day/week/month. Once you’ve begun taming your inner critic, you’ll feel lighter and freer than ever before. You may even have the courage and confidence to embark on a new adventure.